Before They Were (Jazz) Stars

By | August 20, 2012

Listen to This EpisodeTorch singer turned civil rights icon Abbey LincolnIn this hour, it’s a look at the legends of jazz before they were jazz stars. We’ll talk with our producer Lou Blouin about some of the odd jobs your favorite jazzers held down before they made it in the music business and bring in our jazz historian Lewis Porter to introduce us to Miles Davis—talent scout extraordinaire—and the epic list of A-listers who made their names in the Miles Davis band. That plus a look at the meteoric rise of electric bass hero Jaco Pastorius and how one of jazz’s most fiercely political voices got her start in the schmultzy New York supper club scene are all coming up in this week’s show. (59:00)

 

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By | August 13, 2012

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Jazz and Comedy

By | August 6, 2012

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A lot of people probably don’t think of jazz as something that’s all that funny. But there’s more than one way to get a laugh out of all things jazz. In this hour, we’ll talk with stand-up comic Jeff Cesario about how his former life as a jazz musician helps make him a better comedian. And we’ll bring in our jazz historian Lewis Porter to talk about jazz’s vaudeville roots and how jazz lost its sense of humor in the 1950s. That plus a look at jazz prankster Dizzy Gillespie and plenty of jazz guaranteed to make you smile, are all coming up in this hour of The New Jazz Archive. (59:00)

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By | July 28, 2012

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By | July 23, 2012

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By | July 16, 2012

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By | July 8, 2012

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By | June 30, 2012

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By | June 23, 2012

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By | June 17, 2012

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